4gifs:

Cat body slams a bully

4gifs:

Cat body slams a bully

7,944 notes

If any man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar. If any man tells you he trusts America, yet fears labor, he is a fool. All that harms labor is treason to America.

301 notes

A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.
Winston Churchill (via politicalprof)

291 notes

After consulting with Doctors, Danielle and her husband decided that it would be more humane to terminate the pregnancy than allow the fetus to be born, only to die shortly thereafter. Attorneys, however, informed her that this wasn’t possible:

After consulting attorneys, doctors told Deaver and her husband that the Nebraska law prohibited an abortion in their case. She had to wait, give birth, and watch the infant die.

The result?

Nebraska’s new abortion law forced Danielle Deaver to live through ten excruciating days, waiting to give birth to a baby that she and her doctors knew would die minutes later, fighting for breath that would not come. And that’s what happened. The one-pound, ten-ounce girl, Elizabeth, was born December 8th. Deaver and husband Robb watched, held and comforted the baby as it gasped for air, hoping she was not suffering. She died 15 minutes later.

To give you some grounding info, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has stated that there is zero evidence that a fetus can feel pain at 20 weeks of gestation, and notes that there is no legitimate evidence demonstrating that a fetus can feel pain in the weeks thereafter.

But if we assume arguendo that a fetus can feel pain, then that means that the fetus experienced more pain during the 10 days it was being crushed to death by Danielle Deaver’s uterus (as a result of not having an amniotic sac to cushion its body), than it ever would have if the pregnancy had been terminated shortly after Danielle’s water broke. The law caused more harm than it alleviated underneath its own premise.

1,381 notes

A veiled woman consoles a man in Yemen — a moment captured by Spanish photographer Samuel Aranda, which was named the World Press Photo of the Year on Friday. 

A veiled woman consoles a man in Yemen — a moment captured by Spanish photographer Samuel Aranda, which was named the World Press Photo of the Year on Friday. 

Things That Powerful, Wealthy, Intelligent Countries DON’T WORRY ABOUT

politicalprof:

  • The name of the Gulf of Mexico
  • Freedom Fries
  • Freedom Toast
  • The sexual orientation, gender, race, ethnicity or creed of people who want to serve the nation
  • Iran closing the Strait of Hormuz for 10 or 15 minutes, which is about as long as they can do it

I’m sure there’s a lot more. But you get my point.

88 notes

politicalprof:

So the Violence Against Women Act is up for renewal this year, and surprise of all surprises … not a single Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to reauthorize the act. Not a single one.
Why? Well, the editorial in the New York Times puts it this way:
The main…

444 notes

Self-deprecating, too liberal for their own good, today’s progressives stand back and watch, hands over their mouths, as the social vivisectionists of the right slice up a living society …